Lindsay Lohan and Mohammad bin Salman, an item? The new gossip podcast from Page Six speculates

Last month, The Ringer’s pop culture completist podcast returned from hiatus with a renewed vigor. Having thoroughly celebrated and analyzed all of HBO’s Game Of Thrones and the Harry Potter series of books and movies, hosts Mal and Jason turn their attention to the franchise with perhaps the largest cultural footprint of all: Star Wars. Now, there are many debates about the “correct” way to consume this series of 10+ films, but they’ve chosen to go with chronological order as opposed to release order. That means starting with Episode I: The Phantom Menace and working their way, week by week, to the release of Episode IX: The Rise Of Skywalker this December. Last Monday’s episode saw them rounding out the prequel trilogy with a discussion of Episode III: Revenge Of The Sith, a.k.a. the good prequel (though there are plenty who would refute that claim). Finally, the machinations of Sheev Palpatine come to light, the origins of Darth Vader are solidified, and the Jedi Order goes out with a whimper. Through it all, Binge Mode examines what’s good, what’s bad, and what’s downright awkward about this film that nearly marked the end of Star Wars as we know it. [Dan Neilan] If you have...

2019 Mazda CX-5 Signature Driving Notes: Under Pressure

Mazda is on a mission is to move its models upmarket. Powertrain upgrades to the now-more-svelte 6 sedan and an output increase to the MX-5 Miata roadster are a step in the right direction. And now the CX-5 follows suit, as it nabs the turbocharged 2.5-liter engine from the larger CX-9 (it’s also available as an option on the 6). What’s clear is that the CX-5 maintains its place atop the throne of fun-to-drive crossovers, however, its upgrades (and some lack thereof) don’t drastically increase the already-likable crossover’s mass appeal. At least, not to some of Motor1.com’s editors. The price hike associated with opting for the turbocharged engine and Mazda’s outdated infotainment aren’t doing the more powerful CX-5 any favors, either. Good news is, what we love about the cheaper and less-powerful CX-5 remains intact in this new top-of-the-line Signature model. It’s hard to hate the Mazda CX-5 Signature. In fact, save for its outdated-looking infotainment system and near useless gauge cluster screen (it measures a sizeable 7.0 inches and displays minute details that a far smaller screen can convey), Mazda’s compact crossover is a joy in almost every way imaginable. It looks gre...