Cranes are critical in a number of industries, including aircraft/aerospace, auto manufacturing, chemicals and minerals, pulp and paper, steel production, and utilities, as well as the grain industry, logging, rail yards, and ship loading. Traditionally, industrial cranes have been operated by human operators sitting in cabs in the cranes. In such instances, the operator’s actions are guided by the hand signals of a person outside of the crane. “In the past, cranes were operated by the cab operators,” says Brad Robinson, president of Robinson Engineering, which has been offering remote control technologies since 1962. “The guy on the ground was hooking the chains, doing the loading, and having to wave his hands to direct the operator where to move the crane.” In other cases, rather than have an operator sitting in a cab, a person outside of the crane would operate the unit, using pendant pushbutton stations suspended from the crane. In recent decades, technology has advanced to the point where cranes can be operated by remote control. While this technology has been around since the 1960s, it has continued to improve over the years, with newer system...