Tackling climate change will mean big changes for farming. Catherine Broomfield interviewed Professor Michael Lee, of Rothamsted’s farming research centre in Devon, to find out how those changes might affect the livestock sector Whatever the eventual outcome of Brexit, the soft regulatory power of society may prove to have the greater impact on the long-term direction of UK farming than the hard regulation of State. Millennials, now joined by Greta Thunberg’s Generation Z, are acutely aware of the half burnt platform on which they stand to face an uncertain future. They are self-organising on local and global scales to demand agency over how natural resources are used to sustain our lives on earth, including what we eat, how it is produced, packaged, distributed, and at what environmental cost. They are better informed and connected than any generation before them, acquiring and sharing content in a 24/7 digital world where opinion can become global fact in less time than it takes to eat lunch, and where nuance and complexity are more hindrance than help to points of view which seek to enlighten debate. In part this may explain why those who vociferously advocate the end ...